Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Eating for Strength and Muscular Development, Part Six- Norman Zale (1977)












Table Of Contents

Part I Explaining the path to the top


1 Behind the lines
2 How could I have got it so wrong?
3 Champion DNA?


Part II From child to elite athlete


4 How do champions’ paths differ?
5 From playground to podium: Playing then specialising
6 Winning parents: Getting the balance right
7 Are younger siblings more likely to become champions?
8 Selection myths and compromises revealed
9 Location, location, location: Revealing the geography of success
10 Fitness and recovery epiphanies
11 From passion to persistence, perfection and obsession: How does personality shape champions’ paths?


Part III Turning points and mental tools


12 How do critical episodes shape champions?
13 Broken bodies, broken minds?
14 What is in a champion’s mental toolbox?
15 Learning from defeat: Rhetoric or reality?
16 Confidence
17 Keeping it all together: Nerves
18 Under pressure: New approaches


Part IV The Coach


19 What I wish I’d known about Olympic coaching when I started
20 Learning from behind the lines: Coaching stories


Part V Specialist characteristics


21 Do champions think differently about pain?
22 A pothole, or worse, on the path: Depression
23 Looking back and redirecting the rocket: Retirement
- See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/podium-9781472902160/#sthash.a7GkheEs.dpuf








Table Of Contents

Part I Explaining the path to the top


1 Behind the lines
2 How could I have got it so wrong?
3 Champion DNA?


Part II From child to elite athlete


4 How do champions’ paths differ?
5 From playground to podium: Playing then specialising
6 Winning parents: Getting the balance right
7 Are younger siblings more likely to become champions?
8 Selection myths and compromises revealed
9 Location, location, location: Revealing the geography of success
10 Fitness and recovery epiphanies
11 From passion to persistence, perfection and obsession: How does personality shape champions’ paths?


Part III Turning points and mental tools


12 How do critical episodes shape champions?
13 Broken bodies, broken minds?
14 What is in a champion’s mental toolbox?
15 Learning from defeat: Rhetoric or reality?
16 Confidence
17 Keeping it all together: Nerves
18 Under pressure: New approaches


Part IV The Coach


19 What I wish I’d known about Olympic coaching when I started
20 Learning from behind the lines: Coaching stories


Part V Specialist characteristics


21 Do champions think differently about pain?
22 A pothole, or worse, on the path: Depression
23 Looking back and redirecting the rocket: Retirement
- See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/podium-9781472902160/#sthash.a7GkheEs.dpuf








Table Of Contents

Part I Explaining the path to the top


1 Behind the lines
2 How could I have got it so wrong?
3 Champion DNA?


Part II From child to elite athlete


4 How do champions’ paths differ?
5 From playground to podium: Playing then specialising
6 Winning parents: Getting the balance right
7 Are younger siblings more likely to become champions?
8 Selection myths and compromises revealed
9 Location, location, location: Revealing the geography of success
10 Fitness and recovery epiphanies
11 From passion to persistence, perfection and obsession: How does personality shape champions’ paths?


Part III Turning points and mental tools


12 How do critical episodes shape champions?
13 Broken bodies, broken minds?
14 What is in a champion’s mental toolbox?
15 Learning from defeat: Rhetoric or reality?
16 Confidence
17 Keeping it all together: Nerves
18 Under pressure: New approaches


Part IV The Coach


19 What I wish I’d known about Olympic coaching when I started
20 Learning from behind the lines: Coaching stories


Part V Specialist characteristics


21 Do champions think differently about pain?
22 A pothole, or worse, on the path: Depression
23 Looking back and redirecting the rocket: Retirement
- See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/podium-9781472902160/#sthash.a7GkheEs.dpuf


Detoxification Follow-Up

Detoxification programs, as described in the previous chapter, are the most effective ways of helping your body to properly assimilate the food you eat. After completing a detoxification program you feel so good that you would like to continue on for another day or even week, but you realize that this is not possible at the present time. You feel great, your skin glows, little blemishes and injuries have vanished, your waist feels taut and small, people tell you that you look different; they can't explain exactly what is different about you but they say you have changed, and this makes you feel even better. What can you do to maintain all you have gained during your detoxification program, to keep felling and looking better than you have ever looked before?

You realize that you cannot follow a detoxification program indefinitely because, due to the lack of certain nutrients, principally protein, great strength and muscle size is impossible to develop while on a cleansing program. Many nutrients are required by the human body and you would suffer if any of these were missing from the diet. However, there are certain nutrients which are valuable not because of what they supply to the body, but rather what they take away from it. These are substances which you must make every effort to include in your diet daily. These are the complex of natural substances known as adsorbents.

The saying 'an apple a day keeps the doctor away' shows how far back into nutritional history these natural adsorbents go. You have no doubt used that expression but have probably never wondered why. One does not have to go far to find the answer. Unlike folk lore which stated that scrapings from the top of an apple cured constipation, diarrhea, modern science says that it does not matter which part is used, the whole apple can cure both. This is because of a natural cellulose which apples, and a variety of other foods contain, called pectin, the ingredient in preserves which makes them gel.

Pectin is not digested by humans. If it were, it would lose its physiological effects because it owes its benefits to a physical attraction which its ultra microscopic particles provide. However, pectin is digested by the acidophilic bacteria in the colon, which utilize it as food. This encourages the growth of these friendly bacteria in the intestines which enhances its normal environment. How does this substance, pectin, work?

If ordinary sand is held in the hand, it sifts gently through the fingers. When the same sand is glued on a piece of paper, there is great increase in the abrasive effect. Similarly, when pectin assumes the gel form in the intestinal tract, while smooth and soothing, the position held by its particles literally acts to scrub clean the intestinal walls. Actually, what happens is this: the suspended particles are held in place by ionic electrical charges which attract toxins and other materials to their surface, precipitating them and causing them to be removed in the normal elimination. Why is this intestinal cleansing action so important?

Much of the intestinal tract is covered by tiny protuberances called villi. There are estimated to be about five million of these tiny, hair-like structures, which have the duty of absorbing food after it has been digested. If these villa could be flattened on an even surface, the 'skin' of the intestinal tract would equal about five square yards, about five times the area of the external body surface. This becomes even more impressive when we consider that this area can be a junkyard for debris resulting in rancidity, fermentation and putrefaction.

Old time physicians would examine the tongue, and if they found it coated, suspected a similar condition throughout the intestinal tract. They often recommended the eating of bran to loosen the debris. It often worked, but not for the reasons they suspected. Today we know that a coated tongue is a poor indication of the intestinal condition; bad breath might be a better indication. The roughage they recommended was effective, no doubt, because it increased peristalsis, and like a dog shaking himself free of water, the intestinal villa threw off the coating which was stifling them. Though a rather crude method, this is still quite effective if you have not been following an extremely poor diet for years. A number of substances can be used to keep the intestinal tract operating at full efficiency after a detoxification program.

Citrus pectin and magnesium gel clay are worthy products. Pectin has a particular affinity for absorbing gases and crystalline forms of toxins; thus it is most useful where fermentation and rancidity are involved. On the other hand, magnesium gel clay has a particular affinity for proteinous materials and is most useful where putrefaction is concerned. The combination of citrus pectin and magnesium gel clay is an excellent measure for maintaining the hygiene of the intestinal tract which was developed during your detoxification process.

There is no roughage better than that provided by whole, raw foods. This means food which is eaten as is provided by nature. Juicing foods is fine for obtaining the vitamins and minerals stored in the cells, but where roughage is concerned, the raw food must be eaten in whole form. Roughage, or fiber, or bulk, whichever you choose to call it, is not an inert substance but a dynamic product which has a bearing on your health due to its physical and biochemical effects.

You might look at a stringy piece of beef and think that the fibrous looking material is fiber. But that is not true. Meat, which can be completely digested, provides no roughage or fiber at all. The terms fiber, roughage, or bulk refer to all plant materials resistant to digestion by digestive juices of man. There are different types of fiber; some increase peristalsis, some absorb toxins and others absorb water from the intestinal tract. They even have the ability to reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood.

In experiments with African natives eating a high fiber diet, it was found that the average time between ingestion and elimination of food was 15 to 18 hours, a rapid transit time compared with that in the United States and England, where the average transit time is two to four days, and up to two weeks for some people. When food stays in the intestinal tract for two to four days and longer, toxic substances ingested with food combine with other toxins caused by bacterial action in the intestines and create problems. A slow transit time allows waste products to do their worst. When transit time is rapid, toxic compounds may be eliminated before they get a chance to accumulate and cause harm.

Potatoes, eaten raw, are a food par excellence. They are both tasty and satisfying.
http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2009/Aug/05/1f5focusm195324-pros-and-cons-munching-raw-potatoe/
They provide a rich source of potassium which has a marked cleansing effect on the intestinal tract when eaten in raw form, particularly before retiring. Add to this an apple, and  by this simple expedient of following this procedure daily, you have one of the best intestinal hygienic procedures available. Drink buttermilk between meals for another intestinal detoxifying factor (lactic acid), or if you do not care for buttermilk, sauerkraut will do admirably.

If you were to take only one kind of supplement, comfrey-pepsin would be the one to take.
http://greenmedicine.ie/school/images/Modules/Plant-Sciences-I/Comfrey-Powerpoint.pdf
It would probably do you more good than any other pill. It digests the mucus that coats that walls of many men's small intestines. The mucus is caused by certain foods such as pasteurized milk, bread and many cooked foods. The mucus coats the villi on the wall of the small intestines and blocks the absorption of nutrients from food. Sometimes the mucus gets so thick and tough it is almost like a plastic film. Almost no nutrients can get through to the body and a hard training man could consume $500 worth of supplements along with a good diet and still get almost no value from them. He would be practically staving so he tends to keep eating more food including protein, and even digestive enzymes do no good because though the food is being digested it can not be absorbed, so it is passing out of the body unused. Comfrey is a very sticky, gooey vegetable matter. It tends to stick the enzyme pepsin to the mucus on the intestinal wall long enough to digest some of the mucus. If the tablets are taken for several weeks, this mucus will gradually be digested. The blood can then receive more nutrients from the food and transport it to the muscles where it is needed to provide material for growth and development. Sometimes it takes three months after a cleansing program to reach a state of health where maximum absorption is the rule rather than the exception. After that, it's a good idea to use the tablets once a year for three or four weeks to keep the mucus from building up.

It has been found that every person examined who is overweight has a mucus problem, reports one doctor. This seems to indicate that these people are eating heavily of protein foods because their bodies require the protein, but they can only absorb the smaller carbohydrate molecules while the large protein molecules are blocked from being absorbed.

It takes a but little know-how and initiative to contribute immeasurably to a healthy intestinal environment. If you will follow the suggestions here you have every right to expect to get the most nutritional value from the food you eat.

Next: In the Raw.          










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